consequence-estimator

THE CONSEQUENCE ESTIMATOR (2010)

How much do we let statistics and machines influence our decisions in everyday life? In decision making, many people inform themselves online. Whilst we make many decisions every day, the consequences of our actions are often not clear to us until much later. What if we had information about these possible consequences readily at our hand in the moment of taking action? By searching the Internet for certain phrases, such as “When I switch the light on…” an algorithm receives information
on what possibly could happen, by finding this phrase in blogs, forums and other websites. The search results which are found most often, are displayed on the display of the device first, as they are the most likely consequences. After that, other possible consequences are displayed. The seemingly endless knowledge and mass of data from the Internet is brought down to a little device, giving out information at the right place and time, just when you need it.

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consequence estimator 3-small

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pixelated2

PIXELATED FOR PRIVACY (2010)

“Pixelated for Privacy” is an installation in public space, about the practise of pixelating houses in the German version of Google Street View.
In Germany there is an option to opt out of your house showing up on Google Street View, to “maintain privacy”. When the first city in Germany was up on Google Street View in 2010 what people were most interested in were the first pixelated houses. In the media, there was an extensive discussion about whether being able to view somebody‘s house online invades their privacy, whereas viewing it in real life doesn‘t. To eliminate this discrepancy between online and offline, the project physically
pixelates a house which had been opted out of street view. The real-life pixelation reverses the original intention of its inhabitants, namely to maintain a level of anonymity and privacy, by highlighting the house. The time-consuming process of creating physical pixels by hand, and connecting these with rivets and strings, resembles the tremendous effort needed to process the pixelation requests, and the exaggerated discussion about this privacy issue, although being much less problematic than many other privacy related aspects of online services.

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Pixelated House in Google Street View

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views of the past-web

VIEWS OF THE PAST (2009)

“Views of the Past” is a digital form of a historic monument.
Downloadable from a website, there was an instruction on how to hack old cellphones* and turn them into a digital-monument-device, which is placed in public space. When people with bluetooth enabled mobile phones pass the device, they receive a photo on their phone. The photo is a selected from a flickr-pool of photos showing the location where the device is placed at a past moment..
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*Nokia phones, code written with Python for S60.

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soundtap2

SOUNDTAP (2009)

“SoundTap” was an interactive installation for an exhibition at Aquarius Watermuseum in Mühlheim. When the four watertaps are turned, different water sounds emerge. These water sounds change depending on how quickly and how far the taps are opened, and generatively change until, at some points, the water sounds distort into abstraction. Different soundscapes can be explored, thus letting the viewer explore the
aesthetic, narrative and 2 semantic qualities of water sounds. Potentiometers were placed inside the watertaps, connected with custom designed parts and wired with over 60 metres of cables, which run through the pipes – to the speakers (one in each bucket), to the power supply, and to an Arduino, which sends real-time data to a PureData patch that generates the sounds depending on the interaction of the user.

© 2017